Swallowtails and Dragonflies

The agastace is in full bloom now and attracting butterflies and bees of all types.  I should have studied entomology!  I just checked out Sue Hubbell’s book about bugs, “Broadsides from the Other Orders.”

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I think this is a female eastern tiger swallowtail on the agastache ‘blue fortune’ giant hyssop plant.

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Here is a side view of the eastern tiger swallowtail on the hyssop.  I like the striped body.  It looks like she is using her proboscis to sip nectar.  Is that kind of like a straw?

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Limenitis arthemis – red spotted purple butterfly, I think, on agastache.  At first I thought it was a black swallowtail, but it does not have a tail.

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Here is a closed wing view of the red spotted purple butterfly on agastache.  You can see the pollen on its body.

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Just below the agastache a black swallowtail caterpillar is resting in the parsley.  There are a lot of hungry birds in the yard, though, so I am never sure if these guys will survive.

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Agastache ‘blue fortune’ giant hyssop.’  On the left is heliopsis helianthoides ‘Summer Sun.’  The agastache plant is really buzzing, mostly with bees and flies.

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I think this is a carpenter bee on the agastache.  In any case it is a very big bee.

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Here is a different kind of bee.  It looks a little more like a honey bee of some type.

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Red admiral butterflies are fairly common in the yard.  Here on Echinacea purpurea – purple coneflower.

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There are small white cabbage moths all over the yard.  Here on Russian sage with miscanthus ornamental grass in the background.

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One day I was looking out of the living room window and I saw something slide out of the bottom of the big silver maple tree.  I went outside with my camera and saw this yellow caterpillar with black spikes coming out of its back scurrying across the lawn.  Looking it up online I found that it is an American dagger moth caterpillar.  Apparently they leave the tree and look for a good place to make their cocoon.  The spikey hairs are poisonous.

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Red dragonfly on liatris spicata – blazing star – a native plant.  I saw a number of red dragonflies around the garden yesterday.  In Japanese the name is “aka tombo.”  If you look that name up on line you will hear a famous Japanese song.

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I was having lunch outside one day this week and almost did not see this big green dragonfly that rested on the butterfly weed near where I was sitting.

Praying Mantis update:  I have not seen any praying mantises in the yard this year.  Considering that I found 6 – 8 praying mantis egg sacs from last year I expected more.  It may have been the very cold winter or it may be that we really have a lot of bird in the yard this year eating the babies.  Or it may be some other reason.

8 thoughts on “Swallowtails and Dragonflies

  1. I’ve been questioning the lack of butterflies in my own garden this year, but like you just mentioned maybe it’s all the bird activity. Those caterpillars make tasty snacks so I guess I should be happy about the balance…. but I miss the butterflies.
    Great pictures, you have some really nice closeups!

    • Thank you! I had the monarch the last two weeks and then these new ones this week. I would not have seen them if I had not been hanging out at the agastache, as I have seen the eastern tiger swallowtail and the red spotted purple only once this year. My garden is not really very tame this time of year and that probably helps….

    • Interesting! First time for me. This one came out of the base of the tree. We are planning to have this tree cut down in late fall. I wonder what else is living in the tree.

  2. Really great photographs. I particularly like the butterflies. You capture them with crystal clarity in some excellent poses. And that dragonfly on the liatris… Wowser! Great shot. Pretty bug! 🙂

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